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From the top with a lump or two

21 May From the Top, photo © Fernando Bagué

As the dancers wrapped themselves around each other, the disembodied voice of the choreographer demanded, ‘…more organic-y…like a squirrel…like a cobra…with a whip at the end…’

From the Top, choreographed by Victor Fung and the first dance of an evening jointly curated by Swindon Dance and Swindon Spring Festival, was a hoot. A hilarious insight into the sometimes deliciously unfathomable world of contemporary dance, it began as I expected – two male dancers, Michael Barnes and Jack Sergison, moving in beautiful if mysterious ways – until, it emerged, the pair were actually in a ‘rehearsal’, devising the performance to the ever exacting demands of Victor, their director, for such things as ‘neutral hips’ and an ‘echo’. As the voice wanted more and more, the thoughts running through the (mostly) implacable performers were projected in words onto the screen behind them.

“…thread yourself under his arm and linger there…” said Victor. “…his armpit is not somewhere I want to chill,” came the Michael’s projected reply.

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Beauty without the beast – Heather Widdows

21 May Heather Widdows, photo © Fernando Bagué

Back in my early thirties, a male friend poo-pooed the idea of plastic surgery. I might do it, I replied, when I age, if it looked real (and like me) and I could afford it. He was aghast. I wear make up, after all. What’s the difference?

Now I’m in my late forties, I look in the mirror and wonder. Could I get back to how I used to look? But, back then, was I so happy?

The point is moot. I don’t have the money and, even if I did, couldn’t justify the expense. But does the fact that it’s possible – and that some women do (and look good on it) – does this make me unhappy? Or dissatisfied?

Beauty is an incredibly complicated thing. At Swindon Spring Festival, Professor Heather Widdows shared the findings in her latest book, Perfect Me.

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Poetry, the Enlightening Art

19 May

The 23rd Swindon Poetry Slam did even more than what it said on the tin.

Co-organiser, Clive Oseman, has written elsewhere a detailed review of the poets’ performances. But I believe more has to be said.

This was not about competition but all about celebration. Of course we followed the established Slam knockout process and by common agreement, Jemima Hughes emerged as the rightful trophy holder. On another night, the way these things go, the winner could have been any of at least half a dozen other contestants such was the national-level standard of the poets.

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A witty and articulate host, delivering a splendid writing workshop

19 May

She steps down from the carriage into the yard. Behind the snort of horses and whispers of wind, there is silence. It clings to the branches of the trees, hides in the hedges and the nooks of walls…

So begins The Huntingfield Paintress (Pamela Holmes’ first novel). And my day at Lower Shaw Farm begins in exactly the same way. Arriving early for Pamela’s workshop, I find the farm crowded with silence. The only activity comes from three ducks. The trio quack their way around a corner, briefly inspect my shoes – presumably to check my shoelaces are not made of bread – then waddle away to attend to some undoubtedly serious duck-business elsewhere.

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It’s lucky number seven for Chronicler Louisa at the Think Slam

19 May

After seven years a contestant and four times a finalist, our own Festival Chronicler Louisa Davison lifted the Swindon Spring Festival / Swindon Philosophical Society Think Slam trophy on Saturday night.

Swindon’s sharpest minds gathered to philosophise, debate and – in our winner’s case – rap and swear in three-minute rounds.

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If youth knew, and age could

19 May

Last Sunday night this reviewer was bowled over by the vitality and wisdom of an autistic children’s dramatic performance. Everybody by Revolution Performing Arts. On Monday night, this reviewer was treated to New College students researching and performing original work on the past, present and future of the Arts in Swindon: Our Swindon.

So much for youth: they do seem to know. They do seem to ‘get it’. They do seem to care and to participate and to share. In these and other ways, Swindon Spring Festival is doing what it says on the tin and is celebrating arts, literature, and ideas.

As the packed, thirteen-day Festival reached Wednesday lunchtime of its second week, we queued to listen to the other end of life’s journey: old age. Carl Honoré, having built some international following with a previous book, In Praise of Slow urged us to, take a leaf out of the aforementioned youth and “smash it in our old age.” He urged us to forget about sitting on our sofas, alone at home and to, wherever possible, exercise and stay socially engaged. Exercise and social engagement are the closest thing to a ‘magic bullet’ for older people Carl enlightened us.

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Polarisation, populism, and pessimism – the causes of Brexit and how to address them

18 May

Next week, Britain goes to the polls to elect its representatives in the European Parliament. It’s an election that shouldn’t really be happening: if all had gone to the Brexiteers’ plan, we’d be out of Europe by now. But Parliament’s understandable failure to unscramble the eggs from the omelette before March 31 means it’s off to the booths we go.

And one of the greatest ironies of the Brexit fiasco is that we’ll be doing it with far more enthusiasm than we ever showed for European elections when we were still fully-subscribed members of the club.

If predictions are correct the Brexit Party, buoyed by the anger of frustrated Brexit supporters from across the party political spectrum, will romp home, taking their seats at a Parliament in which they have no real desire to sit.

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